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TWC at AGU FM 2018

January 22nd, 2019

In 2018, AGU celebrated its centennial year. TWC had a good showing at this AGU, with 8 members attending and presenting on a number of projects.

We arrived at DC on Saturday night, to attend the DCO Virtual Reality workshop organized by Louis Kellogg and the DCO Engagement Team, where research from greater DCO community came together to present, discuss and understand how the use of VR can facilitate and improve both research and teaching. Oliver Kreylos and Louis Kellogg spent various session presenting the results of DCO VR project, which involved recreating some of the visualizations used commonly at TWC, i.e the mineral networks. For a preview of using the VR environment, check out these three tweets. Visualizing mineral networks in a VR environment has yielded some promising results, we observed interesting patterns in the networks which need to be explored and validated in the near future.

With a successful pre-AGU workshop behind us, we geared up for the main event. First thing Monday morning, was the “Predictive Analytics” poster session, which Shaunna Morrison, Fang Huang, and Marshall Ma helped me convene. The session, while low on abstracts submitted, was full of very interesting applications of analytics methods in various earth and space science domains.

Fang Huang also co-convened a VGP session on Tuesday, titled “Data Science and Geochemistry“. It was a very popular session, with 38 abstracts. Very encouraging to see divisions other than ESSI have Data Science sessions. This session also highlighted the work of many of TWC’s collaborators from the DTDI project. Kathy Fontaine convened a e-lightning session on Data policy. This new format was very successfully in drawing a large crowd to the event and enabled a great discussion on the topic. The day ended with Fang’s talk, presenting our findings about the network analysis of samples from the cerro negro volcano.

Over the next 2 days, many of TWC’s collaborators presented, but no one from TWC presented until Friday. Friday though was the busiest day for all of us from TWC. Starting with Peter Fox’s talk in the morning, Mark Parsons, Ahmed Eleish, Kathy Fontaine and Brenda Thomson all presented their work during the day. Oh yeah…and I presented too! My poster on the creation of the “Global Earth Mineral Inventory” got good feedback. Last, but definitely not the least, Peter represented the ESSI division during the AGU centennial plenary, where he talked about the future of Big Data and Artificial Intelligence in the Earth Sciences. The video of the entire plenary can be found here.

Overall, AGU18 was great, other than the talk mentioned above, multiple productive meetings and potential collaboration emerged from meeting various scientists and talking to them about their work. It was an incredible learning experience for me and the other students (for whom this was the first AGU).

As for other posters and talks I found interesting. I tweeted a lot about them during AGU. Fortunately, I did make a list of some interesting posters.

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WebSci ’17

August 14th, 2017

The Web Science Conference was hosted by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute this year. The Tetherless World Constellation was heavily involved in organizing the event and ensuring the conference ran smoothly.The venue for the conference was the Franklin Plaza in downtown Troy. It was a great venue, with a beautiful rooftop.

On 25th June, there were a set of workshops organized for the attendees. I was a student volunteer at the “Algorithm Mediated Online Information Access (AMOIA)” workshop. We started the day off with a set of talks. The common theme for these talks were to reduce the bias in services we use online. We then spent the next few hours in a discussion on the “Role of recommendation algorithms in online hoaxes and fake news.”

Prof. Peter Fox and Prof Deborah McGuinness, who were the Main Conference Chairs, kicked off the Conference on 26th June. Steffen Staab gave his keynote talk on “The Web We Want“.  After the keynote talk, we jumped right into a series of talks. A few topics caught my attention during each session. Venkata Rama Kiran Garimella’s talk on “The Effect of Collective Attention on Controversial Debates on Social Media” was very interesting, as was the talk on “Recommendations for groups in location-based social networks” by Fred Ayala. We ended the talks with a Panel disscussion on “The ethics of doing Web Science”. After the panel discussions, we headed to the roof for some dinner and the Web Science Poster Session. There were plenty of Posters at the session. Congrui Li and Spencer Norris from TWC presented their work at the poster session.

 

27th of June was the day of the conference I was most looking forward to, since they had a session on “Networks : Structure, Identifiers, Search”. I found all the talk presented here very fascinating and useful. Particularly the talk “Herirachichal Change Point Detection” and “Adaptive Edge Probing” by Yu Wang and Sucheta Soundarajan respectively. I plan to use the work they presented in one of my current research projects. At the end of the day on 27th June, the award for the papers and posters were presented. Helena Webb won the best paper award. She presented her work on “The ethical challenges of publishing Twitter data for research dissemination”. Venkata Garimella won the best student paper award. Tetherless’ own Spencer Norris won the best poster award.

On 28th June, we started the day of by giving a set of talks on the topic chosen for the Hackthon, “Network Analysis for Non-Social Data”. Here I presented my work on how Network Analysis techniques can be leveraged and applied in the field of Earth Science. After these talk, the hackathon presentations were made by the participants. At lunch , Ahmed Eliesh from TWC won first place in the Hackathon. After lunch, we had the last 2 sessions at WebSci ’17. In these talks, Shawn Jones’ talk present Yasmin Alnomany’s work on “Generating Stories from Archived Collections” and Helena Webb’s best paper winning talk on “The ethical challenges of publishing Twitter data for research dissemination” piqued my interest.

Overall, attending the web science conference was a very valuable experience for me. There was plenty to learn, lots of networking opportunities and a generally jovial atmosphere around the conference. Here’s Looking forward to the next year’s conference in Amsterdam.

 

 

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Historic launch of the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development Data

September 30th, 2015

An information email in early September from Simon Hodson, the CODATA Executive Director, attracted my deep interest. His email was about the high-level political launch for the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development Data. I was interested because I have worked on Open Data in the past few years and the experience shows that Open Data much more comprehensive than a sole technical issue. I was excited to see that there will be such an event initiated by political partners and focusing on social impacts. And thanks to the support from the CODATA Early Career Data Professionals Working Group, which made it possible for me to head to New York City to attend the forum in person on September 28th.

The forum was held in the Jade Room of the Waldorf Astoria hotel, and lasted for three hours from 2 to 5PM, with a tight but well-organized schedule of about 10 lightning talks, four panels and about 30 commitment introductions from the partners. The panels and lightning talks focused on why open data is needed, how to make data open and, especially, what and the value of open data for The 17 Global Goals for Sustainable Development and the social impact that the data can generate. I was happy to see that the successful stories of open geospatial data were mentioned several times in the lightening talks and the panels. For example, delegates from the World Resources Institute presented the Global Forest Watch-Fires (GFW-Fires), which provides near-real time information from various resources that can enable people to take prompt response before the fire be out of control. During the partner introductions, I heard more exciting news about the actions that the stakeholders in governments, academia, industry and non-profit organizations are going to take actions to support the joint efforts of the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development Data. For example, the Children’s Investment Fund Foundation will invest $20m to improve data on coverage of nutrition interventions and other key indicators by 2020 in several countries; the DigitalGlobe commits to provide three countries with evaluation licenses to their BaseMap service as well as training sessions for human resources; the Planet Labs commits $60 million in geospatial imagery to support the global community; and the William and flora Hewlett Foundation is proposing to commit about $3m to the start-up support of the secretariat for a Global Partnership for Sustainable Development Data. A list of the current partners is accessible on the partnership’s website.

The Global Partnership for Sustainable Development Data has a long-term vision for the year 2030: A world in which everyone is able to engage in solving the world’s greatest problems by (1) Effectively Using Data and (2) Fostering Trust and Accountability in the Sharing of Data. The pioneering partners in this effort have already committed to deliver more than 100 data driven projects worldwide to pave the pathway for the vision 2030. For the first year, the partnership will work together to achieve these goals: (1) Improve the Effective Use of Data, (2) Fill Key Data Gaps, (3) Expand Data Literacy and Capacity, (4) Increase Openness and leverage of Existing Data, and (5) Mobilize Political Will and Resources.

The forum was chaired by Prof. Sanjeev Khagram, with over 200 attendees from various backgrounds. During the reception time after the forum, I had a brief chat with Prof. Khagram about CODATA and also the Early Career Data Professionals Working Group, as well as the potential collaborations. He informed me that the partnership is open and invites broad participation to address the sustainable development goals. Prof. Khagram also mentioned that a bigger event, the World Data Forum, will take place in 2016. I also had the opportunity to catch up with Dr. Bob Chen from CIESIN, Columbia University about recent activities. It seems that ‘climate change’ is the topic of focus for several conferences in the year 2015, such as the International Scientific Conference, the Research Data Alliance Sixth Plenary Meeting and the United Nations Climate Change Conference, and Paris is the city for all these three events.

The report A World That Counts: Mobilising The Data Revolution for Sustainable Development, prepared by the United Nation Secretary-General’s Independent Expert Advisory Group on a Data Revolution for Sustainable Development, provides more background information about the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development Data.

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Open Source Software & Science Reproducibility

January 14th, 2014

This year my contribution to the AGU fall meeting 2013 was all about the development of Open Source Software to enable the reproducibility of scientific products, with both a Poster and an Oral presentation. The AGU was the perfect opportunity to share my ideas on a topic that is one of my main interests.

This was my 2nd time at AGU, but my first time with an oral presentation which turned in a real challenge!

The main issue was a combination of 2 factors : I had decided to generate the slideshow in realtime as HTML from an online IPython Notebook. I thought it would be cool to show this functionality, as well as the work itself. Unfortunately, I was dependent on an internet connection at the time of the presentation, but alas, at AGU the presenter computer doesn’t have internet connection! Definitely not the best conditions for a web based slideshow generated “on-the-fly” by the execution of an IPython Notebook.

I found out about the lack of connectivity only 2 days before my presentation. I must have misunderstood the AGU oral presentation guidelines, but when I didn’t find an explicit mention of the lack of an internet connection, I took it for granted that that wouldn’t be an issue. Big mistake!

I decided it would be safer to prepare a power-point presentation, and some time later, I had one. Deep breath; I would be safe. But… what a disappointment !

I was so excited about the idea of showing my work running in realtime instead of showing a static (somewhat boring) ppt  presentation!!!

I kept thinking about alternative solutions, though, and an idea quickly came to me. If the lack of internet stands in the way of an interactive, realtime demo there should be no problem in running a static HTML slideshows instead; at least that is what I thought …

I used the IPython “nbconvert” utility and its “convert to slide” option, and I successfully converted my workflow from an interactive IPython notebook running in slideshow mode to a static HTML5 slideshows, yeah! The audience wouldn’t get to see how this was done, but at least they would get to see the result.

Happy with the final HTML presentation I finally went to the “AGU’s Speaker Ready Room” to upload and test my presentation. Unfortunately, my HTML presentation would not run offline. The lack of internet was giving me troubles with missing JavaScript files, missing fonts, images-urls to be replaced with path to static files, broken hyperlinks etc … it was not as easy as I thought.

It took more than 3 hours to fix all the bugs on account of a really slow internet connection running from my phone, but finally i got my presentation perfectly  running off line on the AGU computers !

In the end, my talk ran very smoothly. A complete workflow for “catchments characterization” using exclusively open source software, running online and fully reproducible thanks to the use of open source software and an open dataset! I felt really good, as I think I successfully got my message across, both in words and in actions.

To top it all off, my presentation came just at the right time. Before me, two other presentations during my session had mentioned the use of the IPython Notebook as open source software tool to enable reproducibility of scientific work. They had highlighted that it shows great potential and that it deserves further investigation. I think my presentation gave them even more proof of that! Even the chairman acknowledged this when he stated: “Before we heard about it, but now we saw it in action!” I felt very proud of what I had done. The effort I put into running the HTML slideshow definitely paid off!!!

 

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Three reasons to attend ESIP winter meeting

January 15th, 2013

Erin Robinson has posted 10 reasons to attend the ESIP winter meeting. I want to provide some feed-backs from the point of view of myself.

Interaction: ESIP meetings are different from a normal conference with sessions of presentation and Q/A. Its sessions are more like break-outs and workshops and require interactions from the audience.

Topics: ESIP meetings cover various topics standing in the fore-front of geo-informatics, cyberinfrastructure and semantic web. It is easy to find a session or poster that could be of interest to you.

Location: Normally the ESIP winter meeting will be held at Washington DC. It’s a city full of museums, good food and other interesting stuff. Take a short visit during the meeting time!

I want to share a image which combines a part of my ESIP 2013 winter meeting poster and a photo taken at the National Museum of Natural History (they share a common topic of geologic time scale).

Capture

An additional information is for students in the field of semantics and/or geoinformatics. You may apply the Rob Raskin scholarship.

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