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TWC at AGU FM 2018

January 22nd, 2019

In 2018, AGU celebrated its centennial year. TWC had a good showing at this AGU, with 8 members attending and presenting on a number of projects.

We arrived at DC on Saturday night, to attend the DCO Virtual Reality workshop organized by Louis Kellogg and the DCO Engagement Team, where research from greater DCO community came together to present, discuss and understand how the use of VR can facilitate and improve both research and teaching. Oliver Kreylos and Louis Kellogg spent various session presenting the results of DCO VR project, which involved recreating some of the visualizations used commonly at TWC, i.e the mineral networks. For a preview of using the VR environment, check out these three tweets. Visualizing mineral networks in a VR environment has yielded some promising results, we observed interesting patterns in the networks which need to be explored and validated in the near future.

With a successful pre-AGU workshop behind us, we geared up for the main event. First thing Monday morning, was the “Predictive Analytics” poster session, which Shaunna Morrison, Fang Huang, and Marshall Ma helped me convene. The session, while low on abstracts submitted, was full of very interesting applications of analytics methods in various earth and space science domains.

Fang Huang also co-convened a VGP session on Tuesday, titled “Data Science and Geochemistry“. It was a very popular session, with 38 abstracts. Very encouraging to see divisions other than ESSI have Data Science sessions. This session also highlighted the work of many of TWC’s collaborators from the DTDI project. Kathy Fontaine convened a e-lightning session on Data policy. This new format was very successfully in drawing a large crowd to the event and enabled a great discussion on the topic. The day ended with Fang’s talk, presenting our findings about the network analysis of samples from the cerro negro volcano.

Over the next 2 days, many of TWC’s collaborators presented, but no one from TWC presented until Friday. Friday though was the busiest day for all of us from TWC. Starting with Peter Fox’s talk in the morning, Mark Parsons, Ahmed Eleish, Kathy Fontaine and Brenda Thomson all presented their work during the day. Oh yeah…and I presented too! My poster on the creation of the “Global Earth Mineral Inventory” got good feedback. Last, but definitely not the least, Peter represented the ESSI division during the AGU centennial plenary, where he talked about the future of Big Data and Artificial Intelligence in the Earth Sciences. The video of the entire plenary can be found here.

Overall, AGU18 was great, other than the talk mentioned above, multiple productive meetings and potential collaboration emerged from meeting various scientists and talking to them about their work. It was an incredible learning experience for me and the other students (for whom this was the first AGU).

As for other posters and talks I found interesting. I tweeted a lot about them during AGU. Fortunately, I did make a list of some interesting posters.

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WebSci ’17

August 14th, 2017

The Web Science Conference was hosted by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute this year. The Tetherless World Constellation was heavily involved in organizing the event and ensuring the conference ran smoothly.The venue for the conference was the Franklin Plaza in downtown Troy. It was a great venue, with a beautiful rooftop.

On 25th June, there were a set of workshops organized for the attendees. I was a student volunteer at the “Algorithm Mediated Online Information Access (AMOIA)” workshop. We started the day off with a set of talks. The common theme for these talks were to reduce the bias in services we use online. We then spent the next few hours in a discussion on the “Role of recommendation algorithms in online hoaxes and fake news.”

Prof. Peter Fox and Prof Deborah McGuinness, who were the Main Conference Chairs, kicked off the Conference on 26th June. Steffen Staab gave his keynote talk on “The Web We Want“.  After the keynote talk, we jumped right into a series of talks. A few topics caught my attention during each session. Venkata Rama Kiran Garimella’s talk on “The Effect of Collective Attention on Controversial Debates on Social Media” was very interesting, as was the talk on “Recommendations for groups in location-based social networks” by Fred Ayala. We ended the talks with a Panel disscussion on “The ethics of doing Web Science”. After the panel discussions, we headed to the roof for some dinner and the Web Science Poster Session. There were plenty of Posters at the session. Congrui Li and Spencer Norris from TWC presented their work at the poster session.

 

27th of June was the day of the conference I was most looking forward to, since they had a session on “Networks : Structure, Identifiers, Search”. I found all the talk presented here very fascinating and useful. Particularly the talk “Herirachichal Change Point Detection” and “Adaptive Edge Probing” by Yu Wang and Sucheta Soundarajan respectively. I plan to use the work they presented in one of my current research projects. At the end of the day on 27th June, the award for the papers and posters were presented. Helena Webb won the best paper award. She presented her work on “The ethical challenges of publishing Twitter data for research dissemination”. Venkata Garimella won the best student paper award. Tetherless’ own Spencer Norris won the best poster award.

On 28th June, we started the day of by giving a set of talks on the topic chosen for the Hackthon, “Network Analysis for Non-Social Data”. Here I presented my work on how Network Analysis techniques can be leveraged and applied in the field of Earth Science. After these talk, the hackathon presentations were made by the participants. At lunch , Ahmed Eliesh from TWC won first place in the Hackathon. After lunch, we had the last 2 sessions at WebSci ’17. In these talks, Shawn Jones’ talk present Yasmin Alnomany’s work on “Generating Stories from Archived Collections” and Helena Webb’s best paper winning talk on “The ethical challenges of publishing Twitter data for research dissemination” piqued my interest.

Overall, attending the web science conference was a very valuable experience for me. There was plenty to learn, lots of networking opportunities and a generally jovial atmosphere around the conference. Here’s Looking forward to the next year’s conference in Amsterdam.

 

 

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