Robert Hull

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Robert Hull
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Hull joined RPI in January 2008 to assume the positions of the Head of the Materials Science and Engineering Department and the Henry Burlage Professor of Engineering. Prior to that he spent about a decade at Bell Laboratories in the Physics Research Division, and twelve years at the University of Virginia, where he was the Director of an NSF MRSEC Center and Director of the UVA Institute for Nanoscale and Quantum Science. He received his PhD in Materials Science from Oxford University in 1983. Hull is highly active in engineering and materials science societies and professional groups. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society and of the Materials Research Society, a member of the European Academy of Sciences, and in 1997 served as president of the Materials Research Society. He has also chaired the Gordon Research Conference on Thin Films, and chaired the Committee of Visitors for the National Science Foundation’s Division of Materials Research. Within the realms of materials and nanoscience, Hull’s research focuses on the relationships between structure and property in electronic materials, fundamental mechanisms of thin film growth, and the self-assembly of nanoscale structures. Other areas of interest include degradation modes in electronic and optoelectronic devices, the properties of dislocations in semiconductors, nanoscale fabrication techniques, nanoscale tomographic reconstruction techniques, development of new nanoelectronic architectures, and the theory and application of electron and ion beams.

Project CO-PI

DOfAMP Project LogoDeveloping Ontologies for Additive Manufacturing Processes (DOfAMP)
Principal Investigator: Jim Hendler
Co Investigator: Robert Hull
Description: We propose the development of the field of materials processing ontology so that the US establishes leadership in this critical technological arena. The goal is the development of a framework, language and algorithm set for organizing and categorizing the myriad relationships between materials processing, properties and structure. No ubiquitous framework currently exists for relating materials processing parameters to properties and structure that translates across multiple materials fields and technologies. In essence, an advanced “Dewey Decimal System” is needed for materials processing, such that data and knowledge that is developed in one materials processing technology can cross-pollinate across other materials technologies.