Towards A Cache-Enabled, Order-Aware, Ontology-Based Stream Reasoning Framework

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Abstract:

While streaming data have become increasingly more popular in business and research communities, semantic models and processing software for streaming data have not kept pace. Traditional semantic solutions have not addressed transient data streams. Semantic web languages (e.g., RDF, OWL) have typically addressed static data settings and linked data approaches have predominantly addressed static or growing data repositories. Streaming data settings have some fundamental differences; in particular, data are consumed on the fly and data may expire.

Stream reasoning, a combination of stream processing and semantic reasoning, has emerged with the vision of providing ``smart`` processing of streaming data. C-SPARQL is a prominent stream reasoning system that handles semantic (RDF) data streams. Many stream reasoning systems including C-SPARQL use a sliding window and use data arrival time to evict data. For data streams that include expiration times, a simple arrival time scheme is inadequate if the window size does not match the expiration period.

In this paper, we propose a cache-enabled, order-aware, ontology-based stream reasoning framework. This framework consumes RDF streams with expiration timestamps assigned by the streaming source. Our framework utilizes both arrival and expiration timestamps in its cache eviction policies. In addition, we introduce the notion of ``semantic importance`` which aims to address the relevance of data to the expected reasoning, thus enabling the eviction algorithms to be more context- and reasoning-aware when choosing what data to maintain for question answering. We evaluate this framework by implementing three different prototypes and utilizing five metrics. The trade-offs of deploying the proposed framework are also discussed.

Related Projects:

TW LogoStreaming Data Characterization (SDC)
Co Investigator: Deborah L. McGuinness
Description: This project aims to leverage the novel notion of semantic importance to characterize the importance among the boundless streaming data, so as to provide better query results in terms of accuracy or recall, as well as improve the system response time.
TW LogoStreaming Hypothesis Reasoning (Shyre)
Principal Investigator: William Smith and Deborah L. McGuinness
Description: AIM will advance streaming reasoning techniques to overcome a limitation in contemporary inference that performs analysis only over data in a fixed cache or a moving window. This research will lead to methods that continuously shed light on proposed hypotheses as new knowledge arrives from streams of propositions, with a particular emphasis on the effect that removing the expectation of completeness has on the soundness and performance of symbolic deduction platforms.

Related Research Areas:

Data Science
Lead Professor: Peter Fox
Description: Science has fully entered a new mode of operation. Data science is advancing inductive conduct of science driven by the greater volumes, complexity and heterogeneity of data being made available over the Internet. Data science combines of aspects of data management, library science, computer science, and physical science using supporting cyberinfrastructure and information technology. As such it is changing the way all of these disciplines do both their individual and collaborative work.

Data science is helping scienists face new global problems of a magnitude, complexity and interdisciplinary nature whose progress is presently limited by lack of available tools and a fully trained and agile workforce.

At present, there is a lack formal training in the key cognitive and skill areas that would enable graduates to become key participants in escience collaborations. The need is to teach key methodologies in application areas based on real research experience and build a skill-set.

At the heart of this new way of doing science, especially experimental and observational science but also increasingly computational science, is the generation of data.

Concepts: