Publishing and Editing of Semantically-Enabled Scientific Metadata Across Multiple Web Platforms: Challenges and Experiences

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Presented at the AGU Fall Meeting 2011

Abstract:

Following on work presented at the 2010 AGU Fall Meeting, we present a number of real-world collections of semantically-enabled scientific metadata ingested into the Tetherless World RDF2HTML system as structured data and presented and edited using that system. Two separate datasets from two different domains (oceanography and solar sciences) are deployed for use in three different web environments, Drupal, MediaWiki, and a custom web portal written in Java, to highlight the cross-platform nature of the data presentation. In addition, a single domain dataset is shared between two separate portal instances to demonstrate the ability for this system to offer distributed access and modification of content across the Internet. Lastly, we will present how future improvements to this and other systems will evolve distributed, decentralized collaborations for scientific data sharing across multiple research groups. Using existing web standards and services, as well as new software and services, we utilize shared modular ontologies implemented in the Web Ontology Language (OWL) and inferencing and rules provided by triple stores and SPARQL endpoints. Stylesheets used to transform concepts in each domain as well as shared terms into HTML will be presented to show the power of using common ontologies to publish data and support reuse of existing terminologies. Custom forms are built and used to enable end users to create new instances and edit existing instances to help with curation of structured data.

History

DateCreated ByLink
December 4, 2011
20:31:18
Patrick WestDownload
December 3, 2011
10:28:03
Patrick WestDownload
December 2, 2011
22:51:59
Patrick WestDownload

Related Projects:

Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management OfficeBiological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO)
Principal Investigator: Peter Fox
Description: The Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) was created to serve PIs funded by the NSF Biological and Chemical Oceanography Sections as a location where marine biogeochemical, ecological and oceanographic data and information developed in the course of scientific research can easily be disseminated, protected, and stored on short and intermediate time-frames.
SeSF Project LogoSemantic eScience Framework (SeSF)
Principal Investigator: Peter Fox
Co Investigator: Jim Hendler and Deborah L. McGuinness
Description: Over the past few years, semantic technologies have evolved and new tools are appearing. Part of the effort in this project will be to accommodate these advances in the new framework and lay out a sustainable software path for the (certain) technical advances. In addition to a generalization of the current data science interface, we will include an upper-level interface suitable for use by clearinghouses, and/or educational portals, digital libraries, and other disciplines.
TW LogoTW Website Project
Description: A semantically-powered Tetherless World Website running in the Drupal CMS. This combines many web standard technologies, including RDF, SPARQL, XSLT, and XHTML.
DCO-DS LogoVirtual Solar Terrestrial Observatory (VSTO)
Principal Investigator: Peter Fox
Co Investigator: Deborah L. McGuinness
Description: VSTO is a collaborative project between the High Altitude Observatory and Scientific Computing Division of the National Center for Atmospheric Research and McGuinness Associates. VSTO is funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation, Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE) in the Shared Cyberinfrastructure (SCI) division.

Related Research Areas:

Semantic Foundations
Lead Professor: Deborah L. McGuinness
Description: Semantic Foundations
Concepts: Semantic Web
Semantic eScience
Lead Professor: Peter Fox
Description:
Science has fully entered a new mode of operation. E-science, defined as a combination of science, informatics, computer science, cyberinfrastructure and information technology is changing the way all of these disciplines do both their individual and collaborative work.
As semantic technologies have been gaining momentum in various e-Science areas (for example, W3C's new interest group for semantic web health care and life science), it is important to offer semantic-based methodologies, tools, middleware to facilitate scientific knowledge modeling, logical-based hypothesis checking, semantic data integration and application composition, integrated knowledge discovery and data analyzing for different e-Science applications.
Partially influenced by the Artificial Intelligence community, the Semantic Web researchers have largely focused on formal aspects of semantic representation languages or general-purpose semantic application development, with inadequate consideration of requirements from specific science areas. On the other hand, general science researchers are growing ever more dependent on the web, but they have no coherent agenda for exploring the emerging trends on the semantic web technologies. It urgently requires the development of a multi-disciplinary field to foster the growth and development of e-Science applications based on the semantic technologies and related knowledge-based approaches.

Concepts: eScience
Web Science
Lead Professor: Jim Hendler, Deborah L. McGuinness
Description: Web Science is the study of the World Wide Web and its impact on both society and technology, positioning the Web as an object of scientific study unto itself. Web Science recognizes the Web as a transformational, disruptive technology; its practitioners study the Web, its components, facets and characteristics. Ultimately, Web Science is about understanding the Web and anticipating how it might evolve in the future.
Concepts: Semantic Web
X-informatics
Lead Professor: Peter Fox
Description: In the last 2-3 years, Informatics has attained greater visibility across a broad range of disciplines, especially in light of great successes in bio- and biomedical-informatics and significant challenges in the explosion of data and information resources. Xinformatics is intended to provide both the common informatics knowledge as well as how it is implemented in specific disciplines, e.g. X=astro, geo, chem, etc. Informatics' theoretical basis arises from information science, cognitive science, social science, library science as well as computer science. As such, it aggregates these studies and adds both the practice of information processing, and the engineering of information systems.
Concepts: Semantic Web, eScience