Linking Government Data

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Authors:David Wood

Abstract:

Linking Government Data is the application of Semantic Web architecture principles to real-world information management issues faced by government agencies. A primary goal of this book is to highlight both costs and benefits to broader society of the publication of raw data to the Web by government agencies.

Related Projects:

DCO-DS LogoLinking Open Government Data (LOGD)
Principal Investigator: Jim Hendler and Deborah L. McGuinness
Description: The LOGD project investigates the role of Semantic Web technologies, especially Linked Data, in producing, enhancing and utilizing government data published on Data.gov and other websites.

Related Research Areas:

Data Frameworks
Lead Professor: Peter Fox
Description: None.
Concepts:
Data Science
Lead Professor: Peter Fox
Description: Science has fully entered a new mode of operation. Data science is advancing inductive conduct of science driven by the greater volumes, complexity and heterogeneity of data being made available over the Internet. Data science combines of aspects of data management, library science, computer science, and physical science using supporting cyberinfrastructure and information technology. As such it is changing the way all of these disciplines do both their individual and collaborative work.

Data science is helping scienists face new global problems of a magnitude, complexity and interdisciplinary nature whose progress is presently limited by lack of available tools and a fully trained and agile workforce.

At present, there is a lack formal training in the key cognitive and skill areas that would enable graduates to become key participants in escience collaborations. The need is to teach key methodologies in application areas based on real research experience and build a skill-set.

At the heart of this new way of doing science, especially experimental and observational science but also increasingly computational science, is the generation of data.

Concepts:
Future Web
Lead Professor: Jim Hendler
Description: Since its inception the World Wide Web has changed the ways people work, play, communicate, collaborate, and educate. There is, however, a growing realization among researchers across a number of disciplines that without new research aimed at understanding the current, evolving and potential Web, we may be missing or delaying opportunities for new and revolutionary capabilities. To model the Web, it is necessary to understand the architectural principles that have provided for its growth. Looking into the future, to be sure that it supports the basic social values of trustworthiness, personal control over information, and respect for social boundaries, a research agenda must be pursued that targets the Web and its use as a primary focus of attention. This research requires powerful scientific and mathematical techniques from many disciplines to explore the modeling of the Web from network- and information- centric views.
Concepts: Semantic Web